Explore

Kanji Cheat Sheet: Going to the Movies in Japan

*Shoves popcorn in mouth excitedly*

By 1 min read

Halfway through the middle of my course at Japanese language school, my teacher asked if anyone had gone to the movies since moving to Japan. No one raised their hand. She asked why, and most if not all of my classmates said they felt intimidated because they couldn’t understand enough Japanese to watch a movie without subtitles.

While the movie-going experience is pretty much universal, there are some things to look out for.

Looking back, I realized that one of the fastest ways to get a more native understanding of Japanese is to immerse yourself in pop culture. Immersion allows you to learn new vocabulary and grammar points you may not have come across in JLPT review guides. Try listening to J-Pop, watching Japanese Youtubers, or if you live in Japan taking a trip to the movies!

While the movie-going experience is pretty much universal, there are some things to look out for. In this Kanji guide, you’ll learn the how-tos of watching a movie at the theatre in Japan.

Going to the movies

Search for the movie theatre nearest you by placing えいかん (eigakan) on Google maps. If you happen to live in Tokyo, there are tons of theatres around Shinjuku and Shibuya.

Once you enter the lobby, check for the screening schedule, or じょうえいスケジュール (joueisukejuru). When you see it be sure to double-check if the movie you want to watch is subtitled まく (jimaku) or dubbed (fukikae). After deciding on which type of movie you’d like to see, now it’s time to buy your ticket.

English Japanese Romaji
Movie theatre 映画館 eigakan
Subtitled 字幕 jimaku
Dubbed 吹き替え fukikae
Screening schedule 上映スケジュール joueisukejuru

Read the full article on GaijinPot Study.

Related

Learn

Tweet of the Week #103: Marie Kondo Japanese YouTube Channel Sparks Joy with Fonts and Color

Why are Marie Kondo's international and Japanese channels so different?

By 2 min read

Explore

Share Your Favorite Memories of Japan on Social Media and Win ¥100,000 in JNTO Travel Vouchers

Foreigners living in Japan can share their favorite destinations using with the hashtag #MyOwnPersonalJapan.

By 4 min read

Explore

Exploring Koyasan, Japan’s Most Holy Town

Don’t call it Mount Koya. This sacred complex in Wakayama Prefecture is much more than just a mountain.

By 8 min read