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Sakura House & Sakura Hotel: Your Second Home in Japan

To celebrate 30 years of accommodations for foreigners in Japan, Sakura House has released a new video highlighting their guests, memories and services.

By 3 min read

Moving to Japan can be a big change in someone’s life. You’ll have a lot of big choices to make, such as finding the perfect place to live—somewhere that fits your budget, your lifestyle, proximity to work or school or even just somewhere close to the action.

The experience can also be a bit overwhelming for first-timers. It isn’t always easy making friends or connections, and knowing just where to look for a place to stay is almost as much trouble as moving in. Thankfully, you don’t have to go it alone.

For 30 years, Sakura House and Sakura Hotel have provided foreigners with accessible living space in their apartments, guest houses, hotels and shared houses for short- and long-term stays. If you’re looking for a stress-free move, a foreigner-friendly environment and to meet new people while you’re at it, look no further than Sakura House.

Whether here or there

Photo:
Yanesen walking tour with Sakura Hotel guests.

Sakura House, the company that owns and operates both Sakura House and Sakura Hotel, prides itself on adaptability. Whether you’re planning a move to Japan after the coronavirus or are already living here—working or studying and looking to move to a big city like Tokyo—Sakura House or Sakura Hotel have the perfect room for you.

In some cases, it’s even possible to move in on the same day you choose a location. You can always guarantee your questions will be answered within two days, thanks to Sakura House’s welcoming multilingual support network.

Support goes beyond simply finding your room. Sakura House will help new residents with everything from registering at the local ward office to preparing packages at the post office. That kind of extra care and attention is why residents returning to Japan also return to Sakura House.

More than a room

Photo:
A cherry blossom tour with Sakura House residents.

Networking is vital in Japan—whether for friendships or to advance your career. Sakura House has welcomed more than 80,000 guests over the years and knows how important it is to stay in touch.

—“Sakura House will help new residents with everything from registering at the local ward office to preparing packages at the post office.”—

Even during the current pandemic, Sakura House checks in with its current, former and prospective guests to ensure everyone is safe and supported. As one manager at a Sakura House in Asakusa says: “They were once our guests, but as time passed, they became our friends and family.”

Guests at Sakura House and Sakura Hotel come from all over the world with different cultures and interests, and they have a chance to share those experiences with others. Sakura House organizes events, such as dances, Japanese cultural experiences and cooking classes. Most of the items on the international menu at Sakura Cafe come from guests—with fresh fruits and vegetables from a community garden.

Sakura House can also be a place to facilitate and grow your hobbies. For example, resident Alan, a painter and personal trainer, uses his room as a studio, of sorts. Sakura House even helps Alan find ways to create events and display his art on their walls.

“I would never have thought of Tokyo as a place to come, but it’s very welcoming toward foreign people,” says Alan. “There’s a really good group at my [Sakura House]. We used to have dinners every night, people from Turkey, Germany, France, Peru—all cooking their home cuisine. We would do workouts as a group once a week. That was really fun, developing great friendships.”

Booking your stay

To book your stay or see a list of available rooms in more than 100 locations throughout Tokyo and Kyoto, start by visiting the official Sakura House website. Reservations are quick, simple and only require a fully refundable deposit of ¥20,000.

Room types are available for short- and long-term stays and include:

Sakura House thanks all its former and current guests and looks forward to accommodating many new visitors. When Japan is open again to everyone, don’t hesitate to book your stay at Sakura House—your second home in Japan.

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