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Tweet of the Week #149: Japanese Cat is The Most Viewed Cat on YouTube

This cute feline just won a Guinness World Record.

By 2 min read

Meet Japan’s number one pet influencer, Mochimaru, a cute Scottish fold cat. Since this summer, Mochi-sama holds the Guinness Record for “most viewed cat on YouTube,” after the furry star’s channel Mochimaru Diary (もちまる日記にっき) reached  619,586,290 views on August 12th.

The channel launched less than two years ago and is dedicated to the daily life of Mochimaru. The channel gained a lot of popularity during the pandemic. His audience—primarily adults—has been following the lovable ball of fur almost daily. They’ve watched him arrive at his new home, his first trip to the vet and even his first taste of salmon sashimi. It’s like The Truman Show of cats!

The videos offer slice-of-life videos to kitty fans, and the subtitles give Japanese language learners an excellent opportunity to relax while studying!

A purrfect record

https://twitter.com/catmotimaru/status/1434471790789607433?s=20

もちさまがギネス世界せかい記録きろく™に認定にんていされました

  • 記録きろく YouTubeでもっと視聴しちょうされたねこ
  • 認定にんてい2021にせんにじゅういちねん8月はちがつ12日じゅうににち

“Mochi-sama has been certified as a Guinness World Record!

  • Record: Most Viewed Cat on YouTube
  • Date of certification: August 12, 2021″

The Japanese passive voice

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Kare wa joshi ni shikara remashita…

It’s back-to-school season and what best than to take a closer look at the passive voice (受身形). Where English discourages the usage of the passive voice, the Japanese language prefers passive constructions whenever the action (“what is done”) or the consequences (“what is done to…”) are more important than the subject (“who does”).

In the following example, the second sentence sounds more natural to Japanese people. What matters is less the subject who did the action (the boss) but what was done—giving praise or scolding.

  • 上司じょうしわたしめました: My boss praised me.
  • 私は上司に褒められました: I was praised by my boss.
  • 上司はかれしかりました: The boss scolded him.
  • 彼は上司に叱られました: He was scolded by the boss.

In the following example, the second sentence sounds more natural to Japanese people. What matters is less the subject who did the action (the boss) but what was done—giving praise or scolding.

In a passive construction, the subject is marked with に.

In a passive construction, the subject is marked with the particle に. The topic of the sentence, 私は and 彼は, are often omitted. Here’s a quick reminder of the construction of the passive voice:

  • U ending verbs: う → 買われる
  • Ru ending verbs: てる → 建てられる
  • する → される
  • くる → こられる

Vocabulary

Japanese Romaji English
日記にっき nikki Diary
ギネス世界せかい記録きろく ginesu sekai kiroku Guinness World Record
認定にんていされる nintei sareru (Be) recorded
視聴しちょうされる shichou sareru (Be) viewed
認定にんてい ninteibi Record date

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